Black Label Cobs

A few of the very earliest cobs have unusual black labels1), unlike the Label Styles usually found.

  • Notable features:
    • Black labels with gold ink (see photos below)
    • Brass ferrules in the center holes and in the drive hole, chamferred on inner edge
    • Larger diameter wooden core (1.85” (or 1-27/32”) in comparison to 1.82” (or 1-13/16”))

The labels are reminiscent of those used on the Autophone instruments previously manufactured by the company, which often used black and gold in a similar round format. The brass ferrules, although high quality, would have been more expensive than the stamped ferrules of later design, and probably required more labor. The larger wooden core actually prevents the cobs from playing correctly on most instruments, as the valve tips tend to ride on the core, opening them slightly and playing extraneous notes. Since only very low numbers are found in these cobs (hymns started with #1 and popular titles started with #101), it is presumed that these were the earliest production.


Known black label cobs and cobs with brass ferrules:

No. - NameComments
#1 - The Sweet Bye And Bye Red labels, no ferrule in drive hole
#2 - Nearer, My God, To Thee Red labels, but otherwise identical
#5 - Duke Street Red labels, no ferrule in drive hole
#9 - I'll Stand By Until the Morning Red labels, no ferrule in drive hole 2)
#101 - Waltz—Les Roses
#102 - Polka—La Bonne Bouche
#103 - When the Swallows Homeward Fly
#106 - The Soldier's Joy
#107 - When the Leaves Begin to Fade Red labels, but otherwise identical
#108 - Sweet Violets
#109 - Marching Through Georgia
#110 - Victoria Polonaise
#111 - Waltz—My Queen Red labels, but otherwise identical
#111 - Waltz—My Queen Red labels, no ferrule in drive hole
#132 - The Dreamland Waltz Red labels, no ferrule in drive hole 3)


1) Similarly constructed cobs are also found with red labels, as noted
2) , 3) information provided by Mark Pichla
 
 
 

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